Tag Archives: commerce

Report: News orgs must help users with identity, privacy; consider non-profit collaboration to share tech, users, content

BRANSON, Mo., Aug. 4, 2011 — A non-profit collaboration to share technology, users and content could help news organizations find new revenues and become better at serving the public, according to a report by a Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute researcher at the University of Missouri.

The report, “From Paper to Persona: Managing Privacy and Information Overload; Sustaining Journalism in the Attention Age,” was published on Thursday and presented to the annual meeting of the Newspaper Association Managers Inc., meeting in Missouri.  It’s the result of more than two years of study by a Reynolds fellow and consultant, Bill Densmore, a career journalist, publisher and entrepreneur.

“As news and the economics of newspapers come unglued, what will sustain journalism?” Densmore asks. “The answer involves a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is how to do a better job of helping the public find knowledge they need, amid a glut so huge that the scarce human commodity is now attention, not information. The Internet provides the opportunity to do so.”

The report advocates forming an industry collaborative,  tentatively called the “Information Trust Association” by Densmore. It would define and foster a common technology playing field that respects consumer privacy, and makes rules for the exchange of both content and users’ identity information.

“Such a system might allow news originators of any size – possibly including bloggers – to exchange payments among each other and with public users for news information and sponsored material,” says Densmore.

Two thirds of the 55-page paper chronicles what Densmore says is the end of mass markets as a viable strategy for selling the advertising that has largely supported American journalism.  Instead, he says, the Internet is increasingly able to deliver commercial messages targeted to specific users’ interests and profiles – or personas.

As a result, the paper says, publishers and broadcasters have to learn how to use technology to become expert at personalizing information services. And that, says Densmore, requires them to help consumers with their privacy and personal information. They might help users to earn rewards, or pay for specialized information.

The last third of the paper argues that the Information Trust Association is the best way to help with this change. The idea is potentially controversial because the U.S. news industry has not typically cooperated on technology standards,  instead being buffeted and shrunk by services originated elsewhere such as Craig’s List, eBay, Facebook or Google.

“The point of the Information Trust Association would be to foster collaboration that increases convenience and choice for consumers,  allowing multiple service providers to compete on a common playing field,” says Densmore.  The paper offers nine examples of industries where this has occurred, including railroads, cable TV, the electric grid, electrical equipment, banking and stock exchange, and the Internet itself.

The genesis of the paper was Densmore’s 2008-2009 “Information Valet Project” fellowship at Reynolds.

“Our challenge is no longer how to access information, but how to manage our time and attention amid the glut. News organizations have the opportunity to move from being paid to deliver one-format products (broadcasts, print stories, to providing trusted multimedia, personalized services with unique insight, knowledge, curation, and aggregation. They can help users manage their privacy and identity — their persona,” says Densmore.

The white paper is now available to view and download online. Rich with more than 230 live links to additional resources and reading, “From Paper to Persona” can be found here: http://rjionline.org/news/paper-persona

To comment, join a discussion or learn more about next steps for the Information Trust Association idea, read Densmore’s blog post at:  http://tinyurl.com/persona-blog

June 23-25 “congress” gathering aims to establish trust, identity, commerce services for news

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Three U.S. newspaper trade groups and the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute are teaming up to seed ideas and a possible solution to how news and other information can be managed and sold online.  “From Blueprint to Building: Making the Market for Digital Information,” is being billed as a three-day “action congress” to discuss issues of trust, identity and Internet information commerce.

 The June 23-25 event at the University of Missouri-based research center will include unveiling of a 148-page business plan for a proposed news-industry collaborative, according to Bill Monroe, director of the Multistate Digital Task Force, an ad-hoc group formed by state press associations in Missouri, Kansas and Iowa with support from several other state trade groups.

 Details of the public event, and links to participant registration, are at http://www.infotrust.org .

 “This is not a conference, or a summit,” says Bill Densmore, a consulting researcher to the Reynolds Journalism Institute. “ It’s a public congress of news and information service providers — organized by U.S. state press associations. The intention is to move beyond talk, and to launch one or more enterprises or collaboratives.” Reynolds is an ideas-experiments-research center affiliated with the nation’s oldest journalism school, at the University of Missouri.

 Densmore said the gathering has two intentions:

  •  Consider establishing a non-profit collaborative that will specify standards, platforms and protocols for a digital information marketplace; supporting investment and partnering with operating companies and,
  • Define and start raising money for an operating company or association that answers to, and primarily serves and benefits, all America’s newspapers — and is focused on profitably sharing, protecting and managing their digital content. Monroe, who is working from the Iowa Press Association in Des Moines, said the working name for the new entity is the American Newspaper Digital Access Corp.

“Newspapers are working to make the transition from a product-based culture — the daily paper — to a service-based one — helping people manage their privacy, identity and information needs in a web and mobile ecosystem awash with more information than we can intelligently assess,” says Densmore. “News organizations need to become our trusted  information valets  rather than our information gatekeepers.”

“From Blueprint to Build,” is an outgrowth of a December, 2008, summit also convened by the Reynolds Journalism Institute as part of a fellowship undertaken by Densmore called the Information Valet Project.

Trust, identity, commerce: Inseparable building blocks of a free market for digital information

Trust, identity and commerce –they’re inseparable building blocks of a free market for digital information. The Journalism (or Information) Trust Association proposal brings together three vital threads. Unless they are woven together, the Internet will fail to embody the best — or at least most useful — relationships of the physical world. READ MORE.

Blueprint summit — Lee Enterprises’ Greg Schermer sets the stage

Greg Schermer, vp-interactive for Lee Enterprises, opens the first day of the two-day Blueprinting the Information Valet Economy, summit at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, Missouri School of Journalism, Columbia, Mo. Then the 40 participants work to frame the opportunities and risks for online information commerce and try to define the term InfoValet.

Blueprint — Thurs. Part 2 — Problem, value and structure

After framing the issues in the first hour, participants in “Blueprinting the Information Valet Economy” seek in discussion to reach consensus on what problem will be solved by the Information Valet Service, its key values to consumers and how it might be owned and organization. Conversation took place Thurs., Dec.3 at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, Missouri School of Journalism, Columbia, Mo.

Blueprint Day 2: Defining the values, participants and purposes

Participants in “Blueprinting the Information Valet Economy” define the purposes, participants and values of the InfoValet Service during a session Fri., Dec. 5, 2008, in the Smith Forum at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, Missouri School of Journalism, Columbia, Mo. Moderator is RJI fellow Bill Denmsore. Details: http://www.ivpblueprint.org. Speakers include Greg Schermer, Steve Mott, Randy Picht, Martin Langeveld, Elizabeth Osder and others.

Blueprint Day 2: Crafting a Development plan

Participants craft a development plan for the InfoValet Service during “Blueprinting the Information Valet Economy” summit at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, Missouri School of Journalism, Columbia, Mo. This segment occurred Friday morning, Dec. 5, 2008 in the Smith Forum. Details: http://www.ivpblueprint.org

Dec. 3-5 “Information Valet” gathering seeks to define sustainable future of journalism

Blueprinting the information-valet economy

Blueprinting the information-valet economy

Up to 70 executives, technologists and information-industry strategists will register and gather Dec. 3-5 at a new University of Missouri research center for a three-day effort to define and launch a competitive business model for sustaining journalism.

 “Blueprinting the Information Valet Economy: Building a collaborative, shared-user network,” is the title of a three-day collaboration at the new Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI).  The unique action-planning session is designed to change the landscape for news and information-service providers, creatives, artists and publishers.

REGISTER  . . . .  WATCH SHORT VIDEO . . . LEARN MORE.
WATCH LONGER VIDEO (9 MINUTES) AND SLIDE SHOW

“If your business or your passion is news, advertising, information commerce, entertainment, health care, financial services, technology, privacy or personalization, don’t miss the chance to help shape and blueprint the next great Internet innovation,” says Bill Densmore, a 2008-2009 Reynolds Journalism Fellow spearheading the Information Valet Project.

“We’ll plan, join and start creating frameworks in law, governance, marketing, advertising, technology, user identity and transactions for the Information Valet Economy,” says Densmore. “It should be a place where companies compete to provide personalized service to users, yet share those users, and where they make money referring those users to content — and advertising — from almost anywhere.”

“Blueprint” participants will be nestled within the forums, meeting rooms and open spaces of the Reynolds institute, which opened in September as the nation’s first institution dedicated to inventing, researching, shaping, sharing and sustaining the future of news.  “Breakout groups will create frameworks in law, governance, marketing, advertising, technology, user identity and transactions for the Information Valet economy,” said Densmore.

RJI was launched with a $31-million grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Foundation. In September, it opened 50,000 square feet of new and remodeled space including a modern four-story, glass-walled structure inside a preserved, 1892 Victorian gothic building on the University of Missouri campus. RJI has completed or underway more than 60 initiatives to invent and sustain journalism’s future via partnerships with industry and other institutions.

For more information email densmorew@rjionline.org, or phone       573-882-9812      .

Reynolds’ IVP sets academic-year timetable

Sustaining civic-oriented journalism is the goal of The Information Valet Project. The Internet needs additional infrastructure — a sort of news social network — which will update the role and effectiveness of advertising, enhance consumer privacy options, and enable the sharing of information commerce among publishers, producers and artists. The Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri is working on a solution. READ MORE ABOUT US.

This blog will chronicle the early-stage project development.